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THE MAKING OF POWER FOR THE PARKINSONS
by Dr. Ephraim K. Smith

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Smith and Forster then traveled down to New York City where they interviewed Lora Hays, who edited the two short films in 1940-41. She explained that she had been Helen van Dongen’s assistant in editing Power and the Land. When the REA indicated they would like some additional short films based on the outtakes, it had been van Dongen’s suggestion they retain Hays. This was Lora Hays’ first editing job and the start of an editing career that would ultimately win her an Emmy. Hays is still working on various projects. As William J. Sloan writes in an introduction to an interview found on our web site, “Lora Hays has been a leading film editor in the United States for over half-a-century” and “an inspiring teacher of film editing at New York University.”

At Lora’s suggestion, George C. Stoney and William J. Sloan were present during her interview in 2004. Stoney is the Paulette Goddard Professor in Film in the Kanbar Institute of Film and Television at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts. A pioneering independent filmmaker, he has written, produced, and directed over 50 documentary programs. He has been described as the “Father of Public Television.” Sloan heads the Circulating Film and Video Library at The Museum of Modern Art. He has been an adjunct professor in the Graduate Library School of Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, N. Y., where he taught courses in media librarianship. He has also taught in the Graduate Cinema Studies program at New York University. From 1967 to 1984 Sloan was the Editor of Film Library Quarterly, a media journal for professionals. Stoney and Sloan participated directly in the videotaped interview with Lora Hays. (Subsequently, William Sloan prepared an essay on Hays, found on our web site.)

While in New York City, Smith researched the Douglas Moore Papers in the Rare Book and Manuscript at Columbia University. This collection included approximately 200 items in 45 boxes and 1 flatboard. These materials included a memorandum indicating the length of the early segments of Power and the Land and also sheets from the original score composed by Douglas Moore. As the result of this research, Dr. Smith prepared a short essay on this Pulitizer prize-winning composer that can be found on this web site. As that web essay indicates, some of Moore’s music, is still available, including a CD with themes derived from his score for Power and the Land.


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