Home Page
Click to Enlarge the Image

 
THE MAKING OF POWER FOR THE PARKINSONS
by Dr. Ephraim K. Smith

Current Page: 7
Previous Page in Essay (page 6) Next Page in Essay (page 8)
Jump To Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19


Dr. Smith was also able to interview several childhood friends of the Parkinsons. John W. Parkinson III, a nephew and a close friend of Bip’s, had been visiting on the Parkinson farm on several occasions during the filming in 1939. He recalled that Ivens had clearly been in charge, but that there had been grumbling by some of the cameramen about the numerous retakes. John also remembered that some of the scenes were not exactly what they purported to be. The dinner table scene, showing the family eating by the light of a kerosene lamp, had actually been filmed in mid-afternoon with the shades drawn. Another childhood friend, (the Rev.) John Johnson, vividly recalled rural life before electricity. The constant need to pump water for various farm and household tasks, Johnson recalled, was a real chore. Nor was it fun for a young boy to go out into the dark of night to the outdoor privy. In terms of the Parkinsons, Johnson remembered Hazel as a very devoted mother. George Kuzma, a neighbor and a very good friend of Dan Parkinson, described Hazel as a great cook and caring person. One could not stop by the Parkinson home, Kuzma recalled, without Hazel insisting they eat a cookie or a donut. When George would protest that he had already had something to eat, Hazel would respond “but you have not had one of mine!” Kuzma took pride in the fact that he was in several of the scenes filmed by Ivens and his crew.



Current Page: 7
Previous Page in Essay (page 6) Next Page in Essay (page 8)
Jump To Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19


Return To Top